The Latest

Aug 31, 2014 / 228 notes

futurescope:

Hoverbike - Robot rides Drone

You’ve probably heard about Chris Malloys Drone 3 Hoverbike on Kickstarter (5 days to go). A small-scale drone version of the original hoverbike - a working flying motorcycle. I’ve not paid much attention to the kickstarter project (they reached their goal btw), but their video above shows some pretty decent pizzadrone delivery use cases. The drone stabilization is impressive.

[Hover-Bike Project]

Aug 31, 2014 / 39 notes
Aug 31, 2014 / 132 notes

futurescope:

Fraunhofer IIS presents world’s first emotion detection app on Google Glass

The Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS has adapted its SHORE™ real-time face detection and analysis software to work with Google Glass:

Fraunhofer IIS presents a real-time* face tracker on Google Glass that can read people’s emotions. At the same time it also estimates age and gender of persons in front of Glass’ camera. Privacy is important: everything happens inside Glass – no image leaves the device. Detection is anonymous – no facial recognition. The app is based on SHORE, Fraunhofer’s proprietary software library for real-time facial detection and analysis. Emotion analysis on wearable devices has endless applications. E.g. it can be used in aids for people suffering from ASD (autism spectrum disorders) or for visually impaired.

(* low frame rate shown in the video is due to a bottleneck in the technique used to mirror Glass’ display on a computer monitor.)

[read more]

Aug 3, 2014 / 3,027 notes
engadget:

These smart shoes vibrate to point you in the right direction
Jul 27, 2014 / 82 notes
Jul 27, 2014 / 7,516 notes

wetheurban:

DESIGN: The Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs

The Zuta Labs’ pocket printer has apparently made mobile printing a dream come true.

Read More

Jul 27, 2014 / 42 notes

brucesterling:

*Yeah man.  Take that, Google Self-Driving Car.  Power to the Raspberry Pi people.

engadget:

High-tech headband looks to prevent drowning, bad parenting
Jul 27, 2014 / 18 notes
emergentfutures:

Evernote’s Savvy Plan to Join the Wearables Race

Damian Mehers has his morning routine down. Most days, the senior software engineer for Evernote gets up, opens the app, searches for the list of items his children need for the day (books, gym clothes, lunch, for example), and then sends the kiddos on their way. It’s a fairly streamlined process, though if you ask Mehers, it could stand some improvement. “It would be nice if Evernote just popped that information up for me in an unobtrusive way,” he says.
What Mehers means is, it would be nice if Evernote knew enough about him and his habits to anticipate what he wanted before he had to ask for it. In this scenario, instead of waiting for the designer to search out the list himself, the app would notice he’s at home, take stock of the time and make an educated assumption about what note he might like to see.
Mehers’ vision isn’t far from being a reality. As Evernote moves into the wearables market, the app’s developers are placing more importance on gleaning meaning from its millions of data points to serve up useful, contextualized information. The company just released its app for Android Wear, and its big goal is to build a handy personal assistant who relieves you from mundane tasks like rifling through your pile of digital notes for information.

Full Story: Wired
Jul 27, 2014 / 59 notes

emergentfutures:

Evernote’s Savvy Plan to Join the Wearables Race

Damian Mehers has his morning routine down. Most days, the senior software engineer for Evernote gets up, opens the app, searches for the list of items his children need for the day (books, gym clothes, lunch, for example), and then sends the kiddos on their way. It’s a fairly streamlined process, though if you ask Mehers, it could stand some improvement. “It would be nice if Evernote just popped that information up for me in an unobtrusive way,” he says.

What Mehers means is, it would be nice if Evernote knew enough about him and his habits to anticipate what he wanted before he had to ask for it. In this scenario, instead of waiting for the designer to search out the list himself, the app would notice he’s at home, take stock of the time and make an educated assumption about what note he might like to see.

Mehers’ vision isn’t far from being a reality. As Evernote moves into the wearables market, the app’s developers are placing more importance on gleaning meaning from its millions of data points to serve up useful, contextualized information. The company just released its app for Android Wear, and its big goal is to build a handy personal assistant who relieves you from mundane tasks like rifling through your pile of digital notes for information.

Full Story: Wired

Jul 27, 2014 / 1,784 notes