The Latest

Aug 3, 2014 / 3,007 notes
engadget:

These smart shoes vibrate to point you in the right direction
Jul 27, 2014 / 82 notes
Jul 27, 2014 / 7,513 notes

wetheurban:

DESIGN: The Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs

The Zuta Labs’ pocket printer has apparently made mobile printing a dream come true.

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Jul 27, 2014 / 42 notes

brucesterling:

*Yeah man.  Take that, Google Self-Driving Car.  Power to the Raspberry Pi people.

engadget:

High-tech headband looks to prevent drowning, bad parenting
Jul 27, 2014 / 18 notes
emergentfutures:

Evernote’s Savvy Plan to Join the Wearables Race

Damian Mehers has his morning routine down. Most days, the senior software engineer for Evernote gets up, opens the app, searches for the list of items his children need for the day (books, gym clothes, lunch, for example), and then sends the kiddos on their way. It’s a fairly streamlined process, though if you ask Mehers, it could stand some improvement. “It would be nice if Evernote just popped that information up for me in an unobtrusive way,” he says.
What Mehers means is, it would be nice if Evernote knew enough about him and his habits to anticipate what he wanted before he had to ask for it. In this scenario, instead of waiting for the designer to search out the list himself, the app would notice he’s at home, take stock of the time and make an educated assumption about what note he might like to see.
Mehers’ vision isn’t far from being a reality. As Evernote moves into the wearables market, the app’s developers are placing more importance on gleaning meaning from its millions of data points to serve up useful, contextualized information. The company just released its app for Android Wear, and its big goal is to build a handy personal assistant who relieves you from mundane tasks like rifling through your pile of digital notes for information.

Full Story: Wired
Jul 27, 2014 / 59 notes

emergentfutures:

Evernote’s Savvy Plan to Join the Wearables Race

Damian Mehers has his morning routine down. Most days, the senior software engineer for Evernote gets up, opens the app, searches for the list of items his children need for the day (books, gym clothes, lunch, for example), and then sends the kiddos on their way. It’s a fairly streamlined process, though if you ask Mehers, it could stand some improvement. “It would be nice if Evernote just popped that information up for me in an unobtrusive way,” he says.

What Mehers means is, it would be nice if Evernote knew enough about him and his habits to anticipate what he wanted before he had to ask for it. In this scenario, instead of waiting for the designer to search out the list himself, the app would notice he’s at home, take stock of the time and make an educated assumption about what note he might like to see.

Mehers’ vision isn’t far from being a reality. As Evernote moves into the wearables market, the app’s developers are placing more importance on gleaning meaning from its millions of data points to serve up useful, contextualized information. The company just released its app for Android Wear, and its big goal is to build a handy personal assistant who relieves you from mundane tasks like rifling through your pile of digital notes for information.

Full Story: Wired

Jul 27, 2014 / 1,765 notes
Jul 21, 2014 / 95 notes

futurescope:

Origami Wheel Robot

From  BioRobotics Lab at Seoul National University

The word, origami, comes from the traditional Japanese art of paper folding. The unique characteristic of origami that realizes three-dimensional structures from two-dimensional materials have long attracted attention from various fields such as design, education and mathematics. Many of today’s engineers are using this oriental art to solve problems. It can be used as an inspiration to some architectural designs, and can also be used as fabrication method of robot design or MEMS process. 

By using this origami structure, the deformable wheel can be built without using many mechanical parts; the wheel is built with a single piece of sheet, with specific folds. Moreover, because of the characteristic that the structure constrains its own movement, it is possible to control the shape of the wheel using only a few actuators. When the robot run into the small slit smaller than the wheel diameter, the robot can deform the wheel and it is possible to get through the terrain. The proposed design for the deformable wheel shows the possibility of using origami structure as a functional structure with its own mechanism.

[read more]

Jul 3, 2014 / 14,520 notes

alpha-beta-gamer:

Purrkour is a great Unreal Engine 4 powered cat parkour game where you frolic, pounce, and claw your way through an expensive pad, in pursuit of every cat’s dream – getting someplace really high.

Much like Catlateral Damage, there’s a great amount of fun to be had from smashing up your owners apartment, with paintings, vases, bottles and glasses all ready to feel your feline wrath.  In Purrkour, You’re also given objectives, such as claiming cardboard boxes for your own or collecting kitty coins in hidden or hard to reach areas.  To manage these objectives you you’ll need to use your purrkour skills, including a comical looking jump, wall running and climbing up walls with your claws.

Purrkour was created for the rpgmakerweb Indie Game Contest and is still early in development, with plans to further develop the parkour systems and add new content and levels.  It’s already thoroughly enjoyable though - It’s such good fun being a bad cat.

Play the Alpha, Free

(note: the real cat gif is courtesy of animalsbeingdicks)

(via oldfilmsflicker)

Jun 27, 2014 / 4,422 notes